“If seeds in the black earth can turn into such beautiful roses, what might not the heart of man become in its long journey toward the stars?”

― G.K. Chesterton

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Cardinal’s Song and Raven’s Wing

  Ares Molina    Poetry

Somewhere in Some-Forest 

  Gyöngy Lili Szászvárosi     Visual

Winter’s Passed

  Ben Krieger     Song and Lyrics

Yearning for You

  Sasha Bass    Visual

Sprout

  Zoe Goldenfarb    Film

blue-eyed girls

  Murleve Roberts     Poetry

Silver Springs

  Kerry Sullivan     Visual

As the Rain Falls

  Alissa Xiao, Asha Kollannur, Bella Weiss    Film

Summer’s End

  Kailee Goldstein     Poetry

Facades

  Catharina Quilis     Visual

Starbed

  Lauren Ortega     Poetry

squished

  Lindsay Kuperman     Visual

strectchhh

  Lindsay Kuperman     Visual

Nerves

  Sasha Bass     Visual

Mr. Chester’s Jazz Club

  Ava Murray     Poetry

Off Center

  Jada Crawford     Visual

Catos

  Milan Tangirala     Film

Fire

  Kyra Kramer     Visual

WHEN A BLACK WOMAN IS A STAR

  Murleve Roberts     Prose Poetry

COLORMEYOURS 

  Kailyn Bryant     Visual

Enough is Enough 

  Amina Walker     Visual

Cover Artist Spotlight

  Drew Shechtman

Cardinal’s Song and Raven’s Wing

Ares Molina ’21

A gust—
golden grass and golden hair flail,
caught in the sudden wind
and the woman’s silken red skirt,
tail feathers of a cardinal
swirls

 

The man loops an arm around her waist,
his raven sleeve against her
cardinal hue
She laughs a songbird chirp
as the orange clouds rush across the sky,
pushed by the air

 

The man opens up his black umbrella
above her
and fits it to her hand
Open wing
catching the untameable breath of the sky
beneath dark feathers

 

The gale is stronger than she expects
rushing up through the grass,
tangling her curly hair,
spreading out her soft, silky scarlet
wings
against the raven behind her

 

“Feel that?”
the man asks the woman,
the cardinal
twittering—singing—in delight under his wing
“This is how a breeze feels to birds,
this is how it feels to fly.”

I wrote Cardinal’s Song and Raven’s Wing for a creative writing assignment where we had to write a poem based on an image. I chose a painting by Lauren LaBeau of a man and woman in a windy field. I wanted to incorporate nature into the physical descriptions of the couple, which led to me comparing them to birds.

GYÖNGY LILI SZÁSZVÁROSI ’22     SOMEWHERE, IN SOME-FOREST      WATER COLOR AND INK PEN

I wanted to depict an environment that feels like it’s in the middle of nowhere, and the peace I find in that sort of space. Just completely cut off from anything and everything, except what’s in this little clearing.

I wrote this song about halfway into my freshman year. Prior to this moment, I had been going through a lot of change: new high school experiences, love, loss, and more. This song represents a moment in time when I finally accepted where I am at in my life. It is a moment of clarity.

Winter's Passed

BEN KRIEGER ’22

Verse:
Oh, the green is grass, the winter’s passed It’s over
Oh, the air is clear, now spring is here
It’s done
Oh, life moves on, it’s bothersome no more Oh, I really used to care who’s keeping score


Chorus:
Go, Go, Go, we’ve made it this far
Look how we’ve grown, grown, grow
To something that we’re proud of
And I know, know, the best days are years away But for now I’m happy living these high school days


Verse:
Mmm, standing here accepting what is sent Shrugging off however it may end
But we all know that winter comes again
Instead of preparing, let’s start repairing, let’s make amends
Chorus:
Go, Go, Go, we’ve made it this far
Look how we’ve grown, grown, grow
To something that we’re proud of
And I know, know, the best days are years away But for now I’m happy living these high school days


Bridge:
Looking up at the world, through the eyes of a person Who’s happy where he is, and doesn’t think about the future It’s knowing who you are, accepting all your scars
And if you come out looking numb,
it’s just a learning curve you know you are
Up at the world, through the eyes of a person
Who’s happy where he is, and doesn’t think about the future It’s knowing who you are, accepting all your scars
And if you come out looking numb


Outro:
Oh, the green is grass, the winter’s passed it’s over

SASHA BASS ’21     YEARNING FOR YOU      DIGITAL

One prominent struggle during a large portion of quarantine was my body’s desire to be in physical contact with my friends; the surface of my skin felt bare as if something was torn away and my body longed for that something back. This piece illustrates these desires and want to not be separated any longer from them

ZOE GOLDENFARB ’21     SPROUT      FILM

This was filmed over the summer during quarantine for a UCLA Summer Program that I was attending. It was difficult to shoot outside during the middle of summer while having to wear a mask, but it was so worth it. I created this film to remind everyone of the beauty of life, and how important it is to stop and smell the roses once in a while.

blue-eyed girls

Murleve Roberts ’21

colored means brown for everything except eyes.

hers are like sea glass and aquamarine, 

rippling like waves, sun gracing the surface.

i don’t think they’ll ever leave my memory;

i’ll lie dying and my brain will just replay them

for the same non-reason i remember.

i don’t know if

 

it’s the shade, so summer-sky bright,

or if it’s everything else:

the fine, dancing hair;

the calcium-sand skin;

the pearl-pink, eden rose lips.

i don’t know if

 

i want her, just that i feel shy

because she’s my version of perfection;

a renaissance reverie, monument, feat.

she has the kind of body that’d emerge marble from a master’s hands,

like he’s a god feeling particularly giving,

and i’ve never even seen italy.

never been blessed like mary or david,

never been art or artful, just colored.

i don’t know how

 

she catches my eye when there’s a whole world around me

an anti-american paradise, blurred peridot, blurred fuchsia, blurred gold

a thousand sienna, ebon faces to forget

a thousand boundless sights – 

i am in a brand new country,

i am falling in love with that

– and still.

so i don’t know if

 

she’s special

or if i just want to be her

because she’s white and

because she’s hot and

because i had this vision in the mirror years ago

of a girl reborn with colored eyes:

bright blue, a reverie.

In a lot of romances, the desire to be with someone is conflated with the desire to be someone. This poem explores how Eurocentric beauty ideals twist these feelings and create a question as to why you might want or like someone—e.g. is it because it’s the image you were taught to seek out, or because it’s the image you were taught to aspire to be?

KERRY SULLIVAN ’23     SILVER SPRINGS      PRISMACOLOR COLORED PENCILS AND ACRYLIC PAINT

Stevie Nicks has always been a huge inspiration to me throughout my life, and she has besically raised me! So I decided to draw her ethereal self because she means so much to me.

ALISSA XIAO ’21, ASHA KOLLANNUR ’21, BELLA WEISS ’21    AS THE RAIN FALLS      DOCUMENTARY

For our documentary assignment in film class, one of the band members from Watching Paint Dry wanted to commemorate a certain song they were in the middle of developing. We decided to focus our film on their progress, and explore the deeper meaning behind their music.

Summer's End

Kailee Goldstein ’22

one time i scraped my back falling off of a slide
(it turned red, seemed to blossom like the world’s ugliest flower)
and it was fear, adrenaline, and the scariest of free-falling without consent

 

down into something made unforgiving.
it was a drop off into the abyss,
it was in a place it didn’t belong,

 

little fingers grasping, slippery with pool water,
tangy chlorine and sweet watermelon
and sour blood.

During the quarantine, I’ve had a lot of time to think and reflect on my life and childhood. I was inspired by what I could remember about my early life when I actually had the time to think about it, so I turned it into a poem.

CATHARINA QUILLS ’22     FACADES      VINE CHARCOAL, COMPRESSED CHARCOAL, AND ACRYLIC PAINT ON CANVAS

I made this piece as an honest evaluation of human beings in society nowadays who put a “colorful” facade on their face, but behind that is where the dark, shadowy thoughts are. It is a study on how people prefer to show perfection instead of reality.

Starbed

Lauren Ortega ’21

I have heard that the stars are not really above but below me.
I hang off the Earth like a sweater drying on a clothesline
and the universe yawns as a pulsating cavern,
alive with the light of the glowworms.
When I was twelve years old, I went to a Planetarium,
with my gift shop binoculars and my map of constellations,
the last days of summer melting on my tongue
like the sour apple otter pop I bought outside for exactly sixty cents.
When my friends ask me when it was that I ceased to be a child, I tell them,
growing up is a place, a space, an empty crevice, between the black holes of couch cushions
where my grubby chubby hand searched in the dark for spare change,
a nebulous creekbed where I clad my toes in frog-shaped wellies,
because I could no longer distinguish between alien crawdads and rusty nails,
it is a doctor’s office where I began to read the scoliosis pamphlets on the wall
instead of drawing rockets on the crisp white sheet,
the Neputunian valley between the creases of my father’s forehead
when I told him that lately the world has been too much for me,
it is here — in this Planetarium,
where the invisible man tells me the universe is so vast and ever-expanding
that I am nothing more than an atom-split speck —
It is here, right now, when I look down at the stars.

This piece is about the inevitable experience of growing up and losing one’s childhood innocence. Rather than presenting it as entirely negative, I wanted to show that growing older is just a natural part of taking one’s small place in the enormous universe.

LINDSAY KUPERMAN ’22     SQUISHED      OIL PAINT AND WATERCOLOR

I wanted to portray a unique composition in this artwork along with a wide range of colors and unrealistic proportions and facial features.

LINDSAY KUPERMAN ’22     STRECTCHHH      OIL PAINT

Going into this piece, I knew I wanted to try something different then what I would normally do. I wanted to experiment with adding unrealistic components when I came to the human body, such as colors and form. I took heavy inspiration from surrealist artists and artworks.

SASHA BASS ’21     NERVES      DIGITAL

This piece illustrates the sensations my body feels while experiencing nervousness; heat erupts in my body and rushes to my head, my blood boils and continually increases in temperature as my uneasiness persists.

Mr. Chester's Jazz Club

Ava Murray ’22

crimson light floods a brooklyn jazz club on the corner of 112th and 10th
women drag disobedient partners onto dimly-lit dance floors,
unsuccessful at prying drinks from stubborn hands, a layer of gin coats the floor.
the slap of sunday shoes on the tile die down as the night drones on.
dancers kick off their shoes, forming a jumbled heap in the corner.
a downpour of musical notes rain down on beaming faces.
beads of sweat form on glistening foreheads,
reflecting the traffic lights from the bustling street outside.
inside the club everything is in motion, yet it feels as if time comes to a stand still.

 

the owner, Mr. Chester himself, rhythmically pounds on cracked piano keys,
his foot a steady heartbeat, guiding the music along.
worn saddle shoes contrast the psychedelic carpet of the stage.
south side blues nurturing the soul and dancing thick in the air.
faces warped from the heat of the commotion and heavy intoxication,
edges gelled with perspiration, and afros dense with life.

 

brick walls donning drunkenly engraved initials close in,
cedar stairwells once stationary, now sit staggered and shifting.
you stumble outside and find a somber Mr. Chester in the doorway,
leaning against posters of scantily-clad women and surrounded by smoke.
he hands you his lit cigar.
the wintery night is bitter and sitting on this cobble stone street corner, you find peace,
your vision blurred by the neon sign that reads “the red club,”
your breath, slurred and hot.

I was heavily inspired by 1920’s jazz clubs and the night scene in Brooklyn, NY.

JADA CRAWFORD ’21     OFF CENTER      WATER COLOR MAGIC, INK PENS, ACRYLIC PAINTS 

This piece was an attempt at depicting myself in a new way by capturing my thoughts and writing and drawing them in the moment. I focused on treating the surface like one would treat a diary or personal journal using stationary materials you’d typically see used for journaling.

MILAN TANGIRALA ’21     CATOS      FILM

In my past years at Dreyfoos, I’ve made mostly horror films. But at the start of senior year, I wanted to make something different: a coming of age movie. I was inspired to make Catos after seeing a movie about teens partaking in a local tradition, and since a lot of people jump off Catos bridge in Jupiter, I figured that I could make a film about that. I had a great time working with such a talented cast and crew, and I am very happy with the final cut of the film.

KYRA KRAMER ’22     FIRE      DIGITAL

I wanted to make a piece about what was going on currently. I think in this past year, especially between political issues, protests, and the pandemic, people were doing their best to survive in a situation they didn’t get a say in and that’s what I tried to demonstrate.

WHEN A BLACK WOMAN IS A STAR

MURLEVE ROBERTS ’21

WHEN A BLACK WOMAN IS A STAR 2

This was originally written as a slam poem about my experience watching apotheosized black women settle and get hurt, as a Black girl; celebrities are meant to be untouchable, but five minutes looking at a Black woman, that illusion is broken.

KAILYN BRYANT ’21     COLORMEYOURS    OIL PAINT, OIL PASTEL, ACRYLIC, FABRIC, STRING, MODELING PASTE, MASKING TAPE, AND COLLAGE MATERIAL ON TAR PAPER

As an artist, I believe that the way we view society influences what we believe in and how we view ourselves. “COLORMEYOURS” is about the perspectives of others and the way individuals move through a society that has been given to them. I wanted to incorporate sewn fabrics and collage to create a sense of space and play with physical layers.

AMINA WALKER ’22     ENOUGH IS ENOUGH    ACRYLIC PAINT, MARKER, NEWSPAPER ARTICLES, MAGAZINE CUTOUTS

After the rise in Black Lives Matter protests this summer due the murder of George Floyd, I started to speak up about racial inequality in America and others did too. This issue is especially important to me because as an African American, I’ve experienced racism firsthand. I made this piece because I wanted to get the emotions I was wrestling with onto the canvas, and I hope my art can help bring awareness and spark an emotional connection with the viewers.

Drew Shechtman '21: Cover Artist Spotlight

Q: What inspires you to create art?

A: “The majority of inspiration comes from my favorite music genre, punk/rock from the eighties and nineties. I’ve done research from Dick Hebdige’s book, Subculture: The Meaning of Style, to gain insight about what punk rock says about the body, and apply this to my work. Similarly, punk culture is known for celebrating the perverse, abnormal, and the forbidden, while bridging the gap between conventional beauty and chaos.”

 

Q: How do you describe your art style?

A: “I enjoy mirroring the intensity and “in your face” aspect to create an overwhelming and vehement atmosphere. Weird, but in a way that you can’t stop looking at it, like trainwrecks, you don’t want to stare, but you just can’t seem to look away.”

 

Q: Why did you begin to create art?

A: “Before Dreyfoos, I made art for myself to practice. But once I got into Dreyfoos, I had the opportunity to enjoy and connect with my art on another level.”

 

Q: Is there a difference in how you approach photography and printmaking?

A: “There’s a similarity in the sense that I’m attracted to the human figure, and my photography is about body parts while my paintings are more about portraits. My photography is more conceptual while my painting and printmaking is for practice.”

 

Q: What do you see in your future with your art?

A: “[To] go to school for art to become a mixed-media artist. Assuming I end up working for some graphic design or photography company, I just hope I can find work I like and can sustain myself with it.”

EVERLASTING GAZE  LINOCUT

Because a majority of my work is photography, my drawing and printmaking work allows me to be more loose and experimental. This is the first multi-layer block print I’ve done (three layers in total), and it was inspired from a drawing I had in my sketchbook. I really enjoy the graphic style that can be created using linocuts because they come out so crisp and detailed, and you can reuse the linoleum to make as many prints as you want.